Speak Up On Garbage Expo – Online!

On November 12, 2010, in Speaking Up, by Scott

[Update Nov 26, 2010: The results from the Expo are now online.]

We had a brilliant day at the Speak Up on Garbage Expo!  Participants shared their vision for the future of garbage and recycling services in Winnipeg at the launch of the six-month public participation process. You can take part by sharing your thoughts and ideas here at speakupwinnipeg.com.

Vision Question

In 70 to 85 words, what is your vision for the future of garbage and recycling services in Winnipeg?

Round Table Discussions
In the round table discussions, participants are invited to share their thoughts on three questions and 16 different topics.

The questions should consider the three dimensions of sustainability:

  1. Environmental
  2. Social
  3. Financial

The 16 topics are:


Recycling

  1. It is 2020 and Winnipeg is considered a leader in Recycling. What does that look like to you?
  2. Now, back to the present. What do we need to do to get to that leadership position?
  3. Do you know of other cities that have implemented this successfully? What can we learn from them to help us get to where we want to be?

Discuss the current recycling program and what the future of recycling should look like.


Yard waste

  1. It is 2020 and Winnipeg is considered a leader in yard waste diversion. What does that look like to you?
  2. Now, back to the present. What do we need to do to get to that leadership position?
  3. Do you know of other cities that have implemented this successfully? What can we learn from them to help us get to where we want to be?

Discuss the current yard waste program (leaf, grass and tree trimmings) and what the program should look like in the future. A large amount of yard waste is landfilled each year and contributes to greenhouse gasses through decomposition.


Composting

  1. It is 2020 and Winnipeg is considered a leader in composting. What does that look like to you?
  2. Now, back to the present. What do we need to do to get to that leadership position?
  3. Do you know of other cities that have implemented this successfully? What can we learn from them to help us get to where we want to be?

Organic material (both kitchen waste and yard waste) is almost one half of our garbage. Every year, we throw out approximately 140,000 tonnes of organic waste, which contributes to greenhouse gasses through decomposition. Only a small portion of this is currently composted. What should the future look like for these materials?


Garbage collection

  1. It is 2020 and Winnipeg is considered a leader in garbage collection and handling. What does that look like to you?
  2. Now, back to the present. What do we need to do to get to that leadership position?
  3. Do you know of other cities that have implemented this successfully? What can we learn from them to help us get to where we want to be?

Discuss the current garbage collection program and what the future should look like. The industry trend is that manual collection is not sustainable in the long term.


Brady Landfill

  1. It is 2020 and Winnipeg is considered a leader in managing landfills, specifically Brady Landfill. What does that look like to you?
  2. Now, back to the present. What do we need to do to get to that leadership position?
  3. Do you know of other cities that have implemented this successfully? What can we learn from them to help us get to where we want to be?

Discuss the current operation at Brady Landfill – types of waste and where it comes from. What should our only active landfill look like in the future?


Construction/Demolition

  1. It is 2020 and Winnipeg is considered a leader in diverting construction and demolition material from landfills. What does that look like to you?
  2. Now, back to the present. What do we need to do to get to that leadership position?
  3. Do you know of other cities that have implemented this successfully? What can we learn from them to help us get to where we want to be?

What should we do with the leftover material from constructing or demolishing buildings and structures? Currently there is very little diversion of this material. If done properly, these materials can be reused with very little effort.


Non-residential waste (commercial)

  1. It is 2020 and Winnipeg is considered a leader in managing and diverting non-residential waste. What does that look like to you?
  2. Now, back to the present. What do we need to do to get to that leadership position?
  3. Do you know of other cities that have implemented this successfully? What can we learn from them to help us get to where we want to be?

Discuss the current situation with commercial, industrial and institutional sector waste. There is very little incentive right now for businesses to recycle.


Apartment/condo waste

  1. It is 2020 and Winnipeg is considered a leader in managing and diverting waste from apartments and condos. What does that look like to you?
  2. Now, back to the present. What do we need to do to get to that leadership position?
  3. Do you know of other cities that have implemented this successfully? What can we learn from them to help us get to where we want to be?

Discuss the current situation with apartment/condo waste – the City collects garbage from almost all apartment and condo buildings and recycling from most.


Biosolids management

  1. It is 2020 and Winnipeg is considered a leader in managing Biosolids. What does that look like to you?
  2. Now, back to the present. What do we need to do to get to that leadership position?
  3. Do you know of other cities that have implemented this successfully? What can we learn from them to help us get to where we want to be?

Discuss the current Biosolids program. This by-product of wastewater treatment has been applied to agricultural fields, composted or landfilled. It represents the largest component of “city” waste and is a high value product if treated correctly.


Reduce and reuse

  1. It is 2020 and Winnipeg is considered a leader in getting its citizens to reduce and reuse the material they consume. What does that look like to you?
  2. Now, back to the present. What do we need to do to get to that leadership position?
  3. Do you know of other cities that have implemented this successfully? What can we learn from them to help us get to where we want to be?

Reducing waste is the single most effective way to lessen your impact on the environment. Reusing material instead of discarding to the landfill can help extend the life of the landfill.


Public health and safety

  1. It is 2020 and Winnipeg is considered a leader in protecting public health and safety. What does that look like to you?
  2. Now, back to the present. What do we need to do to get to that leadership position?
  3. Do you know of other cities that have implemented this successfully? What can we learn from them to help us get to where we want to be?

Garbage collection is primarily about protecting public health. How frequently do we need to collect garbage to protect public health? How should we deal with abandoned garbage, vandalism, odour or bedbugs?


Electronic waste

  1. It is 2020 and Winnipeg is considered a leader in diverting electronic waste from landfills. What does that look like to you?
  2. Now, back to the present. What do we need to do to get to that leadership position?
  3. Do you know of other cities that have implemented this successfully? What can we learn from them to help us get to where we want to be?

Computer equipment and electronics can contain heavy metals (e.g., lead, mercury, cadmium) and are not picked up with regular garbage collection.


Hazardous materials

  1. It is 2020 and Winnipeg is considered a leader in diverting household hazardous waste from landfills. What does that look like to you?
  2. Now, back to the present. What do we need to do to get to that leadership position?
  3. Do you know of other cities that have implemented this successfully? What can we learn from them to help us get to where we want to be?

Household hazardous waste is any product discarded from a home that contains volatile chemicals. Improper disposal of leftover hazardous waste products can harm the environment, harm human health, and damage the City’s sewer system.


Bulky waste

  1. It is 2020 and Winnipeg is considered a leader in managing and handling bulky waste. What does that look like to you?
  2. Now, back to the present. What do we need to do to get to that leadership position?
  3. Do you know of other cities that have implemented this successfully? What can we learn from them to help us get to where we want to be?

These are large household items, such as mattresses, furniture, and appliances. Some parts of Winnipeg pay for this service while other areas do not. We collect about 25,000 items each year. Many cities do not collect these items at all.


Local job/market creation

  1. It is 2020 and Winnipeg is considered a leader in creating local markets for diverted products. What does that look like to you?
  2. Now, back to the present. What do we need to do to get to that leadership position?
  3. Do you know of other cities that have implemented this successfully? What can we learn from them to help us get to where we want to be?

Many of the items collected through the recycling program are shipped outside of Manitoba for processing.


Program education/public awareness

  1. It is 2020 and Winnipeg is considered a leader in engaging and informing its residents. What does that look like to you?
  2. Now, back to the present. What do we need to do to get to that leadership position?
  3. Do you know of other cities that have implemented this successfully? What can we learn from them to help us get to where we want to be?

One of the main reasons why people don’t participate fully or accurately is because they are unaware of the program and the requirements.

Comments for this post are now closed.

11 Responses to Speak Up On Garbage Expo – Online!

  1. Ann says:

    I think the City should check out PEI's garbage, recycling, and composed system. It seems to work for the residence as well as the city streets.

  2. leon says:

    I am an inner city landlord (36 suite apartment block) and I live next door in a private house. I Understand the city wants to do away with the side dumpsters ( i think mostly due to illegal dumpers) and I have some sympathy for the city in that regard. Also the dumpsters encourage dumpster divers to spread bed bugs throughout the neighborhood so getting rid of dumpsters might not be a bad idea on that front either. The difficulty is that inner city hoods have high percentage rental and the tenants do not have an interest in maintaining their yards. If the dumpsters are withdrawn the garbage laying around will be a much bigger problem. I suggest the property owner be held accountable for garbage originating on their property. If the black cart that replaces the dumpster is used improperly I suggest the landlord be forced to pay a clean up. Perhaps a local neighborhood clean up crew could do the work and offending properties would be given fines (added to taxes) to pay for it.

  3. Guest says:

    I would like to see a recycling container beside some of the waste containers you see on our streets. Specially near any parks, garden areas, schools and along busy streets such as Broadway, Portage, etc.

  4. MonaCda says:

    I would love to see some sort of composted material given to gardeners, used in the cities' garden projects and any other area that could use this material instead of it going to the landfill. Other cities have a recycling area and it is given freely, why can't Winnipeg do the same in several areas around the city?

  5. luwho says:

    I would like to know why we pay an enviromental fee when we buy things like tretra packs and bottles or cans of pop but there's no place to get this back like in Alberta.

    • SpeakUpWinnipeg says:

      Information on that can be found on the Canadian Beverage Container Recycling Association website: http://cbcra-acrcb.org

      Thanks!

    • Aaron says:

      Other areas have deposits to encourage people to bring containers back to depots, but still also charge fees to pay for recycling (and the depot and refund system) as well. Take a look at Alberta's fee and deposit list here: http://www.abcrc.com/container-information/

      What is way better about Manitoba is that you can just put these containers in your blue box without losing all your deposits (otherwise you have to stockpile the refundable containers until you go to the depot, which I doubt will be weekly). Even more annoying is that in areas with deposits people will come by and steal containers from you blue box meaning the city recycling program loses out too.

  6. Cyndi says:

    We have the 'new' roll out bins and I am all for them. As long as you recycle they are big enough. However….. recently we had 12 days between garbage and with all the extra garbage from Christmas and New Year's Eve even with all the recycling there's just way too much extra garbage that just wont fit in the bin. I was told that we're to play the catch up game. This is far from fair when they're willing to pick-up all the extar garbage from other neighbourhoods without the bins. I live in an area where most people don't have a place to store their extra bags, or just don't care, and will leave them out next to the bin. These bags wont be picked up and stray dogs and cats are going to make a mess. I know this system isn't perfect but I don't see why they can't send an extra truck behind the new truck with some guys to grab the extra bag when there's 12 days between pick up days.

  7. C. bailey says:

    This is to let you know about Wal Marts recycling program. I think this happens at all W.M. but not sure.__they trash bar-b-q's, snow blowers, a lot of tin goods that could be sold at clearance or given to food banks. There is hardley anything maybe a dint, not a bulge on cans , maybe a screw or a minor problem__that can be fixed cheaply and easily. there is a lot of waist out of the Unicity store, I know for a fact and all this stuff goes to our dumps. I work there and do not want to lose my job and I know I would.__ Thank you

  8. Char says:

    All apartments should collect recycling. No excuses. When I moved into my apartment in Fort Rouge I was appalled to find that we are not provided with a recycling receptacle. There are two large garbage dumpsters that residents share with street level businesses that are constantly overflowing with refuse. Roughly half of which is recyclable material.
    We drop off our recyclables at a depot but I know that many people will not do it because it is an inconvenience to them.

  9. Gord says:

    I would like to see recycling depots where we could return various types of containers for deposit. I think this would be incentive for people to keep streets cleaner in Winnipeg. The streets are an embarrassment. It looks like a land fill along our steets and waterways.
    Automated recycling pickup would also be nice to have and the collectors of recycling often throw the boxes with pieces of paper remaining in them and they end up blowing down the street.